In Glasgow, thousands of nationalists have demonstrated for the secession of Scotland from Britain. Prime Minister Nicola Sturgeon wants to apply for a new referendum in London before Christmas.

In Glasgow, thousands of nationalists have demonstrated for the secession of Scotland from Britain. Prime Minister Nicola Sturgeon wants to apply for a new referendum in London before Christmas.
This protester in Glasgow wants to "bury" the Union with London

According to the organizers, about 20,000 people came to the "march for independence". Many waved Scottish flags. Prime Minister Nicola Sturgeon also appeared at the rally.
Sturgeon warned that a victory by the Conservative Party of British Prime Minister Boris Johnson in the parliamentary election on December 12 meant that "Scotland is torn against the will of the European family of states". "The much better alternative is to take the future into our own hands and become an independent country," she explained. However, there were also opposing voices: on the fringes of the mass demonstration, some citizens campaigned with British flags to stay in the United Kingdom.
"Independent Scotland is closer than ever, and it's really within reach," Sturgeon wrote in a post published on the website of their Scottish National Party (SNP) before the demonstration began.
The day before, she had announced that she would try for a new independence referendum in London before Christmas. The upcoming British general election called it a "fateful election": "We face a catastrophic Brexit that would cost jobs and severely damage Scotland as a nation."
UK Independence Rally in Glasgow (Getty Images / AFP / A. Buchanan)
Flags for Scottish independence: In the Brexit referendum, the majority of Scots had voted in favor of remaining in the EU
The Autonomy Act stipulates that Scotland needs the permission of the British Government for a final referendum. The SNP therefore wants to request that the regional parliament in Edinburgh, where Sturgeon is seated, be given the power to make such a referendum.
In a first independence referendum in 2014, 55 percent of the participants had opposed a secession from the United Kingdom. At the Brexit vote in 2016, however, a clearer majority of the Scots, namely 62 percent, spoke in favor of remaining in the European Union. There were calls for a new vote of independence.
Meanwhile, Labor leader Jeremy Corbyn rejected Sturgeon's statement that his party would not stand in the way of a Scottish referendum in the event of a victory. A referendum was "neither necessary nor desirable," Corbyn pointed out.
Share To:

Flying Cent

Post A Comment:

0 comments so far,add yours